Find UK Tuition

Liesbeth Allart - Oboe and Music Theory Teacher in East London

Liesbeth Allart Oboe Teacher (East London)

Liesbeth Allart Gold Member

Contact Me
  • Professional Qualification BMusPerf Rotterdam Conservatoire, Netherlands
  • Professional Qualification MMusPerfRNCM, PgDipRNCM (distinction)
  • Professional Membership Musicians Union

Subjects

(click on the subjects to see other tutors in this area)

Personal Message
Come and enjoy some music making!
II provide a tailor made approach for every student, with a focus on becoming a communicative, expressive musician supported by a solid technique.
Which subject(s) do you teach?
I teach the Oboe and Cor Anglais, Piano and Theory of Music.
Furthermore I coach amateur chamber ensembles and can take woodwind sectional rehearsals for youth orchestras.
Tell me about your qualifications.
I have a Master of Music (performance) degree and a Postgraduate Diploma (performance) (distinction) - both Oboe -from the Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester; a Bachelor of Music (performance) from the Rotterdam Conservatoire (now Codarts), Netherlands. At music college I did two years of piano as a complementary subject, obtaining 90% in my final examination.
What kind of experience do you have?
I have 15 years of teaching experience. My private students are of all ages (currently 4-79!) and of all abilities from complete beginner to diploma-level. I enjoy teaching all those different levels because they each come with their own challenges and rewards!

As a member of Southbank Sinfonia (2009) I have been involved in various education projects with primary and secondary school pupils, ranging from inner city schools to renowned music departments of institutions such as Marlborough College. Teaching ranged from group lessons and improvisation sessions to individual tutoring.

I have been working as a professional oboist for ten years now. I regularly freelance with orchestras in the UK, the Netherlands and Ireland, playing principal and second oboe, and cor anglais as required. Orchestras include the RTE Concert Orchestra, the Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra and the Netherlands Symphony Orchestra. I am also a founder-member of Dutch chamber group De Bezetting Speelt. I have performed as a soloist on various occasions in the UK, the Netherlands and Italy.

I have done several years of Alexander Technique and have a wide range of experience with yoga, t'ai chi and Feldenkrais.
How much do you charge?
£35 for a 60 minute lesson at my home in East London (£20 per half hour; £27.50 per 45 mins - for beginners only)
£40 for a 60 minute lesson when traveling to the pupil's home
Where do you teach?
I teach at my home in Leytonstone - a walk or brief busride away from Leyton/Leytonstone tube stations and a short walk from Leytonstone High Road Overground. I am easily accessed from Redbridge, Newham, Barking, Dagenham, Waltham Forest, Leytonstone, Stratford, Ilford, Essex, East and West Ham, Leyton and Walthamstow. My area has CPS but I have visitor permits for pupils who drive.

At the moment I can only travel to the pupils home if they fit my around current teaching commitments in Clapham South (Monday morning only), Finchley, Highgate or Islington (Tuesdays only).
When are you available?
For lessons at my home there is availability Wednesday through Friday, with some flexibility. Please get in touch with your availability to discuss our options!

I have limited spaces available in Clapham South (Monday mornings) and North London (Tuesday afternoon/evening: Finchley/ Highgate/ Islington).
Which ages and levels do you teach?
For oboe: all ages and levels are welcome. Currently my pupils range from 7-79!
The only requirement is that students own an instrument, or can make their own arrangements for hiring one. As I only teach privately at the moment I have no ties with instrument rental schemes.

For piano: I teach beginners up to grade 5. My youngest pupil at this time is 4 years old! Aspiring pupils will need to have a piano (acoustic or digital, not a keyboard) at home for them to be able to practise (and for me to teach them on if I teach at the pupil's home).
Which qualifications do you prepare your students for?
All grades (ABRSM) and diplomas (ABRSM and Trinity Guildhall)
Do you have an up-to-date DBS (Disclosure & Barring Service, formerly CRB) Certificate?
I do.
Do you belong to any professional organisations?
Musicians Union, Morgensterns Diary Service.
Where and with whom did you train?
I trained at Masters level at the Royal Northern College of Music with Melinda Maxwell and Hansjörg Schellenberger.
For my undergraduate degree I trained with Emanuel Abbühl at the Rotterdam Conservatoire in the Netherlands. I have also had lessons/masterclasses with Douglas Boyd, Thomas Indermühle, François Leleux, David Walter, Alexei Ogrintchouk, Jonathan Small, Ian Hardwick and John Anderson, and with Carolyn Hove and Sue Bohling (cor anglais).
Tell me about some of your current students.
Whereas pleasure in making music should be any learner's main priority, I am proud to say that many of my pupils are doing particularly well. Most of my students who recently did practical exams - including diplomas - obtained distinctions. Two of my pupils recently received prizes and commendations in local competitions and are members of the National Children's Orchestra. A number of pupils have gained music scholarships at their schools, including prestigious schools such as Cheltenham Ladies.
Do you have a personal message for students?
I believe very strongly in our natural desire to explore and learn. However, this natural desire comes in many forms and as a teacher I think it is extremely important to develop a rapport with my students in order to be able to provide them with the structure they each individually need to learn and perform to their full potential.
Even for those who may not pursue music seriously later on, learning an instrument builds confidence and develops skills that transfer into other areas in their lives. Learning an instrument means learning focus, self-discipline and goal setting, to name but a few.
Personally I have always worked with a holistic approach which includes my experiences in other fields than music. I have several years experience with the Alexander Technique, yoga and Feldenkrais, and am a certified masseuse, which gives me a sound knowledge of the human physiology and an insight in any obstacles on the physical and psychological plane that students might encounter in their playing and in their daily lives.
On a physiological level I find this background extremely helpful for teaching. The oboe is a complex instrument in terms of technique, and many learners struggle with aspects of the breathing and the significant resistance of the instrument. I find that being well informed regarding the physiology of breathing helps provide a solid basis which allows them in turn to focus on the music making. Every body is different and rather than providing rules about posture and breathing I like to present the physiological facts and guide the students in finding out what does and does not work for their particular physique.
Psychologically I think it is very important to be aware of the various aspects that come with the different ages. Whereas young learners are often eager and uninhibited, they generally benefit from a clear structure to channel their energy into a specific means of expression - their instrument.
For teenagers building self-confidence would be a key aim; instilling a belief in their own ability to make music, or rather to express themselves in general and find an outlet for that.
Again, these are generalisations, as I like to give my students my full attention as individuals and provide them with a personally tailored approach. This has proven benificial in the past as it has helped me to very successfully work with children with attention deficit problems and mild forms of autism. With one autistic little boy rhythm turned out to be a way into teaching him music, as he was extremely astute in coming up with and repeating complex rhythms. For one eight-year-old with an attention problem sufficient individual responsibility and challenge kept him involved.
I very much encourage self-learning and self-expression and look to stimulate and nurture the student’s own musical ideas rather than providing them with mine. This does however include giving them a musical-historical framework to balance musical instinct with well-informed ideas.
Ultimately, my aim is to teach my students in such a way that they learn to teach themselves.

As a performer I have a wide experience across the field. I regularly perform as an orchestral musician in the Netherlands and the UK, and have appeared in both countries and Italy as a concerto solist. Chamber music includes my Dutch chamber group De Bezetting Speelt for which I am also artistic co-director and in that quality responsible for programming, promotion and fundraising. I also arrange music for this group, and we recently premiered my arrangement of Brahms’ Serenade op.11 for 10 instruments.
Furthermore, I present our concerts, which has led to me being invited to lead public speaking workshops, also in the UK. Combined with my own experience of overcoming performance anxiety in my early years in college, I feel this contributes significantly to my ability to help young people perform.
During my time with Southbank Sinfonia I was fortunate enough to perform at the National Theatre as part of Every Good Boy Deserves Favour, Tom Stoppard’s play for actors and orchestra. This has been an invaluable experience as a performer - the orchestra being very much part of the story and being on stage and involved in the acting, we were coached by some of the countries finest directors in developing ourselves as actors as well as musicians. This has very much expanded my way of thinking and provided me with fresh ideas for my own performing and teaching. Particularly the notions of objective and intention in acting transfer very well into the more abstract medium of music.
To further my performing skills and experience and to challenge myself in the learning field I am taking dance classes in contact improvisation, which challenges and expands the notion of expressing oneself though the physique, which once again feeds my ideas and insights in teaching (from which especially teenagers seem to benefit).